©2020 by RS1 Colin Archer

RS1 COLIN ARCHER

This is the official website for the famous Norwegian resque vessel "Colin Archer", built in Rekkevik - Norway in 1893 and served the Norwegian Sea Resque for 40 years. The boat is still under sail and is currently owned by The Norwegian Maritime Museum in Oslo. The Sailcutter Club Colin Archer has the responsibility for the daily maintainance and to keep the boat sailing. "Colin Archer" is probably the most famous floating Norwegian boat in the world.

THE STORY

1891 'Norsk Selskab til Skibbrudnes Redning, NSSR ("The Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue") was founded. A year later Colin Archer built the first rescue cutter.The result was a double-ender with a continuous deck. The length was 13.95 metres, beam 4.65 metres and draught 2.25 metres. Mainsail, mizzen, staysail, jib and a topsail made a total of 110 sq.metres. This prototype cost NOK 10.900,43, including beer for the workers.


At the launch in late July 1893 the ship was called after its designer, Colin Archer. 'RS1 Colin Archer' proved convincingly during her first season and became the prototype for every rescue cutter built in Norway over the next 30 years. After 40 years of loyal service, the prototype was sold. The ship had an impressive record: She had saved 67 ships, 236 people as well as assisting 1522 vessels carrying some 4500 crew.


In 1961 'RS1 Colin Archer' was found in America in a terrible condition after many years in private hands.She was brought back to Norway, and became a scout's boat for some years, but was finally acquired in 1972 by the Norwegian Maritime Museum. 1973 the museum concluded a long-term agreement with the Seilskøyteklubben Colin Archer (SSCA). Knut and Gunn von Trepka took over the day-to-day responsibility, and have devoted very much time to operating her as a living museum. The hull of 'RS1 Colin Archer' was comprehensively overhauled in 1977 and the interior was refurbished and restored to its original colours in 1993 with financial support from the Norwegian off-shore company Kværner.


'RS1 Colin Archer' ended Winner over All in the Cutty Sark Tall Ships' Race in 1983, leaving 74 ships behind. Also designed by Archer, the 'RS10 Christiania' ended second, and the Stephansen/Archer design 'RS5 Liv' came third. That this was no coincidence was proved in the next race in 1987, when the 'RS1 Colin Archer' again ended Winner over All and 'RS10 Christiania' was second best again. In 1993 'RS1 Colin Archer' ended Winner over All for the third time, and also took home the highest price of the Cutty Sark Tall ships' Races, The Cutty Sark Trophy.


Knut von Trepka (born 1940) is still in business as captain of the vessel. In 2011 his son Christian von Trepka (born 1967) and former crew Tor Erling Gransaether (born 1966) was also appointed skippers by the owner, the Norwegian Maritime Museum.


In the Easter 2013, "RS1 Colin Archer" caught a severe fire, but fortunately not more than a matter of rebuilding. After 12 months of repair and restauration at Maritime Center Fredrikstad AS, the boat was under sail again in the summer of 2014. As a true comeback after the fire, RS1 Colin Archer participated in the 4-days Tall Ships Race regatta from Harling, The Netherlands to Fredrikstad, Norway, winning both her class and the "Over All"-trophy, with more than 2 hours margine to the second.


Keeping 'RS1 Colin Archer' in the water preserves for future generations not only the ship, but also the knowledge of how to sail her.

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125 YEARS OF HISTORY

At the launch in late July 1893 the ship was called after its designer, Colin Archer. 'RS1 Colin Archer' proved convincingly during her first season and became the prototype for every rescue cutter built in Norway over the next 30 years.

IT'S ALL IN THE DETAILS

It is fascinating to learn that all of the boat's features, details and design are based on just one thing: Function. Nothing is there to make it look beautiful, it comes naturally.

SAILING

Keeping 'RS1 Colin Archer' in the water preserves for future generations not only the ship, but also the knowledge of how to sail her.